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Program meetings typically 2nd Tuesday of month
Time: 6:00-7:00 CST
Food & networking at 5:30

Physical Locations

*Bell Helicopter
*L-3- Arlington
*L-3- Greenville
*Lockheed Martin Aero- Fort Worth
*Lockheed Martin MFC- Grand Prairie
*Raytheon- McKinney
*Abbott


Check out presentations from previous North Texas INCOSE Chapter Meetings!

Presentations can be found here

Board meetings typically 1st Tuesday of month
Time: 5:30-6:00 CST



Chapter Event Calendar

Remote Program Access
 
Teams (Video/Audio) - Click here to join the meeting. 
Contact INCOSE North Texas Chapter  ntxinfo @ incose dot net to be added to our meeting emails.
The meetings are not recorded. Presentation are posted in the library and resources during the following weekend if we receive the presentation.


Upcoming Chapter Events

Chapter Meeting April 13

Digital Engineering (DE): The Next Chapter of MBSE by Paul White

Remote Program Access: Teams (Video/Audio)
Join on your computer or mobile app

Abstract:  

What is digital engineering (DE)? How does DE relate to MBSE? In this presentation, we will show how DE is the next chapter of MBSE. We will talk about the Office of the Secretary Defense’s (OSD) Digital Engineering Strategy, released in June 2018. We will discuss the goals of the DES and how you can implement DE in your current and future systems engineering efforts. This presentation is for those who would like an introduction to DE.  


Bio

Paul White is the ICBM GBSD Digital Engineering Branch Lead for BAE Systems at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. He has worked previously at Kihomac, Astronautics Corporation of America, L-3 Harris, and Raytheon. He has 20 years of experience in the aerospace industry.

Paul has been an INCOSE member since 2007 serving in various top leadership roles in the North Texas (Dallas - Fort Worth) Chapter, Chicagoland Chapter, and Wasatch (Utah) Chapter.  He is the current president of the Wasatch Chapter.  Paul has been a leader in the annual Great Lakes Regional Conference (GLRC) since 2012 including conference chair for the 6th and 8th conferences.  He served as the conference chair for the first annual Western States Regional Conference (WSRC) in Ogden in 2018; and he serves on the WSRC Steering Committee for 2019 and beyond. He was awarded the INCOSE Outstanding Service Award in 2019. He serves as the Deputy Assistant Director of Technical Events in INCOSE's Technical Operations organization.

He has a graduate certificate in Systems Engineering and Architecting from the Stevens Institute of Technology, a Master of Science degree in Computer Science from Texas A&M University-Commerce, and a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science from Texas A&M University.  He is a Certified Systems Engineering Professional (CSEP) through INCOSE. 

 


Chapter Meeting March 9

Using Architecture and MBSE to Develop Validated Requirements by Dr. Ron Carson

Remote Program Access: Teams (Video/Audio)
Join on your computer or mobile app

Abstract:  Requirements incompleteness and ambiguity continue to plaque many organizations.  The introduction of MBSE provides an opportunity to relate the structure of the architecture model to the structure of requirements, and synchronize the data between them.
In this presentation we demonstrate how to use model-based systems engineering and the related architecture to develop and validate requirements of all types. We first describe the structure of different types of requirements and map the requirements elements, e.g., function, to elements of the architecture in the MBSE model. We show how these requirements elements map to specific data elements in a particular MBSE tool for all possible types of requirements. Finally, we show how this method enables validation of the requirements from the architecture.
Attendees will gain an understanding of how to integrate their organizational requirements development and MBSE architecture activities by mapping the data elements between them and integrating these into their MBSE tools.  

Bio
:  Dr. Ron Carson is an Adjunct Professor of Engineering at Seattle Pacific University, an Affiliate Assistant Professor in Industrial and Systems Engineering at the University of Washington, a Fellow of the International Council on Systems Engineering and a certified Expert Systems Engineering Professional. 
He retired in 2015 as a Technical Fellow in Systems Engineering after 27 years at The Boeing Company. He is the author of numerous articles regarding requirements analysis and systems engineering measurement. He has been issued six US patents in satellite communications, and two patents regarding “Structured Requirements Generation and Assessment”.
 

 



Chapter Meeting February 9

Innovation and national security by Dr. Tina P. Srivastava
 

Remote Program Access: Teams (Video/Audio)
Join on your computer or mobile app

Abstract: Dr. Srivastava will discuss innovation and national security, focusing on two key challenges: participation and secrecy. The participation challenge is about providing adequate incentives to potential innovators, and we will discuss challenges to incentivizing participants and how to overcome them. We will discuss IP policies, innovation contests, and incentivizing employees within a company, so business leaders can learn how to incentivize their own employees, and also how they can open up the innovation process to enable broader diversity in innovation by applying open innovation strategies to overcome technology hurdles. The secrecy challenge is about technology innovation for national security where secrecy can be an obstacle. Dr. Srivastava is passionate about technology innovation and in particular, how we can harness it to further national security and competitiveness -- for example, targeted innovation to land an astronaut on the moon, or develop stealth machinery for cyber defense. But secrecy in classified environments sometimes makes it hard to recruit and innovate. We will discuss how to navigate various contracting and legal channels. We will also discuss government programs and policies related to technology innovation and government contracting.

Bio
:  Dr. Tina P. Srivastava has served on INCOSE’s Board of Directors and received the INCOSE Inaugural David Wright Leadership Award in 2014 for technical and interpersonal competencies in the practice of system engineering as a means for solving the great challenges of our planet. She is a lecturer at MIT in the areas of aerodynamics, aviation, complex systems, and technology road mapping and selection. She is also the author of Innovating in a Secret World, featured by MIT. Dr. Srivastava co-chairs the PM-SE Integration Working Group and is one of the authors and editors of the book Integrating Program Management and Systems Engineering. As an innovator, entrepreneur, and technology expert, Tina’s experience spans roles as Chief Engineer of electronic warfare programs at Raytheon to cofounder of a venture-backed security startup. She is an FAA-certified pilot and instructor of MIT’s Pilot Ground School course. Dr. Srivastava earned her PhD in Strategy, Innovation, and Engineering, a Masters in System Design and Management, and a Bachelors in Aeronautics and Astronautics, all from MIT.

 


Chapter Meeting January 12

North Texas 2021 by Justin C' de Baca

Location: Virtual (see chapter newsletter and top of this page for connection information)

Abstract: I will be using this meeting to cover a number of things for the 2021 year. Material will include:

  • Promotion of INCOSE IW2021
  • Impact of INCOSE 2020 report
  • INCOSE NTX's Road to Gold Status in 2021
  • Overview of TEAMS for members
We are hoping to get this year off to a great start, and this meeting will be a great place to discuss where we are heading and take any questions from our members.

Bio: Justin is our chapter president this year.

 



All Events

Annual Survey - We want to hear from you!

by Admin33 Chapter | Jan 23, 2021

Please visit our Annual Survey and take time to influence the direction of the Chapter for 2021! Note in particular, if you have an exciting project or discipline that you would like to provide to the Chapter, please send us your interest and ideas to either speak yourself or provide a speaker with SE expertise that our membership may be interested in. If a member is interested in coordinating programs for 2021, we would love to hear from you!

Annual Survey:  https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PSRMFP6

  • ESEP Leadership

    by Courtney Wright | Apr 30, 2021

    The distinguishing characteristic of an ESEP is that he or she is a leader in systems engineering, having contributed to the field through a combination of graduate academics, product development, and technical society involvement. It is not expected that all CSEPs will move up to become ESEPs simply through the passage of time. Nor can someone earn the title of ESEP purely through higher education. 

    An ESEP is given credit for completed degree programs, with a maximum of 1 year for a Master’s degree and 2 years for a PhD. With a minimum of 5 years of leadership required, even a PhD must also be working as a systems engineer in a leadership role on a project or through significant leadership in a technical society (not necessarily INCOSE). 

    The ideal ESEP candidate has leadership experience from a mix of all categories and is recognized beyond his or her own organization for contributing to the field. 

    (1) Chief Engineer vs ESEP - YouTube

  • How do I stay certified?

    by Courtney Wright | Apr 23, 2021
    An INCOSE Systems Engineering Professional Certification is valid for a period of three years for CSEP and five years for ASEP. It is renewable for three or five year periods, respectively. Renewal is not required for ESEP, but ESEPs do need to maintain their INCOSE membership.

    INCOSE Systems Engineering Professionals (SEPs) should track their professional development activities throughout their certification period.  They should keep a log of these activities and additional supporting information in case they are audited. 

    The requirement for continuing professional development is intended to reinforce the need for lifelong learning in order to stay current with changing technology, equipment, procedures, processes, and established standards. Systems Engineering Professionals are encouraged to select meaningful courses/activities which will be of benefit in the pursuit of their chosen areas. The definition of Course/Activity is: "Any qualifying course or activity with a clear purpose and objective which will maintain, improve, or expand skills and knowledge relevant to the CSEP’s or ASEP's area of expertise." In addition to courses, technical society participation, publications, and some job activities can count for professional development. 

    More information is posted at How Do I Renew (incose.org)
  • All SE, all the time

    by Courtney Wright | Apr 16, 2021

    Few of us are lucky enough to do all systems engineering, all the time. We frequently divide our time with clerical tasks (e.g., typing someone else’s requirements into DOORS), management tasks (writing personnel reports), and business development. There are aspects of these that may fit under SE, but they frequently are simply not relevant. We rely on your judgment to draw the line. As a guideline, we do not expect someone who manages a team of 25 people to be doing SE full-time. Similarly, it is rare (but not unheard-of) for someone to be doing full-time, professional-level SE at the beginning of their career with no degree and no prior work experience. In both these cases, we would expect you to pro-rate your experience. 

    Let’s say you had a period of 2 years where you spent half your time in a non-SE role and half of your time doing SE work on a special project. In this case, you would claim 12 months (24 months * 50% = 12 months) of time in SE. You’ll then break that down further to allocate your SE time across the work areas described in the application instructions. E.g., 8 months in Requirements Engineering and 4 months in Process Definition. You should describe your math in the Duties and Responsibilities section of your application alongside the description of the work you were doing. It commonly takes 7, 10, or more years of work to achieve 5 years of SE. You will need to have references to cover the entire minimum period of experience. 

    Does the reverse work, that you can count extra if you worked more than a 40-hour work-week? No, I’m sorry, it doesn’t. The most you can claim for any one month worked (regardless of the number of hours) is one month of SE. 

  • What credit do I get for my advanced degree?

    by Courtney Wright | Apr 09, 2021

    A graduate degree is a great way to expand your knowledge, and we appreciate that it’s an important part of professional development for systems engineers. Advanced degrees apply to the levels of INCOSE certification as follows: 

    ASEP – with neither experience nor a degree required for ASEP, advanced degrees do not give you a leg up except if they have helped increase your knowledge of systems engineering. There is no formal recognition or “credit” for advanced degrees when seeking ASEP, but taking graduate classes after earning ASEP can gain you Professional Development Units (PDUs) that help with your renewal. 

    CSEP – a qualifying degree impacts the work experience requirement for CSEP. The qualifying degree can be either an undergraduate or graduate degree. We require work experience for CSEP, but none of that work may be something for which you earned academic credit. Work experience need not be paid (e.g., it could include being a volunteer project lead for Engineers Without Borders), but your thesis or capstone project does not qualify. Work as a research assistant or teaching assistant typically do not qualify because of the duties assigned in those roles. Like ASEP, you can earn PDUs for graduate classes taken after you earn your certification. 

    ESEP – as for CSEP, a technical graduate degree can meet the “qualifying degree” requirement if your undergraduate degree does not. ESEP also requires leadership of technical projects and ongoing professional development, and in these categories we give explicit credit for graduate degrees. Details are on the individual application and instructions form. Graduate degrees alone are not enough to meet the leadership requirement but can be a piece of it. 

  • When and where can I take the exam?

    by Courtney Wright | Apr 02, 2021
    Anytime, anywhere.

    The INCOSE knowledge exam is now offered online. Candidates may take the exam from their homes using their personal computers, with remote, video proctors. INCOSE will also continue to offer paper exams in classrooms or meeting rooms, proctored by a local CSEP or ESEP. Exams at Prometric computer testing facilities are no longer offered.

    More information about internet-based testing can be found here: Computer Exams (incose.org)
  • Am I qualified?

    by Courtney Wright | Mar 26, 2021

    The Program Office occasionally hears from candidates who want to know if they are qualified for certification. It’s a smart question to ask before you submit your application fee. The reason you submit a fee, however, is that it takes us work to determine for sure that you’re qualified. And you’d be justifiably upset if we said, “Looks good” initially, then rejected you after you paid the application fee and we did a full review of your application. Thus, we do not answer the question of “Am I qualified?” until you submit your fee, application, and other required materials. 

    How should you figure out if you’re qualified? First, review the requirements for each certification level. Do you have the necessary years of experience based on your degree?  Do you have the required depth and breadth of experience? And do your references cover all those requirements? Does your application make it clear that you meet these requirements? If you’ve worked on a proposal for business, you may have been involved with checking for compliance with the RFP terms. Think of this the same way and make it easy for our reviewers to confirm your qualifications. The more you try to help us, the more you will catch your own mistakes and help yourself. 

    It’s sometimes hard to edit your own work, so consider asking a friend to review your application. A current SEP or peer who is going through the process would be a great person to ask. If you don’t know anyone, ask your local chapter if there are any SEPs who can help. If you still come up dry, you can call the Program Office and we’ll try to find you someone. That “someone” won’t be an official representative but will be a SEP who has volunteered to help. We can’t make guarantees on their advice but can tell you that the best application packages are those that were reviewed by multiple other SEPs on their way to our office. 

  • How much time does it take to get certified?

    by Courtney Wright | Mar 19, 2021

    It varies. 

    Whew! Shortest blog post ever. Not the most helpful blog post ever, though. 

    Let’s break them up into “you” time and “us” time. 

    You’re the applicant, and it’s going to take you time to prepare your materials for submission, gather your references (if you’re applying for CSEP or ESEP), and study for the exam (if you’re applying for ASEP or CSEP). This time really varies. 

    Applications – An ASEP application takes less than an hour. CSEP typically takes 10 to 30 hours, depending on how many years of experience you’re documenting, whether you have updated contact info for your references, whether you have your experience described in a way similar to what we ask (not like your resume or CV), and whether you have a good understanding of the instructions. ESEP will likely take 20 to 40 hours. An example application or knowledgeable friend willing to review your application are of great help in cutting down the time you spend figuring out the requirements. 

    References – You are not writing the references. Let me repeat that to be clear: Do not write your own references. They should be in the reference-providers’ own words. Consider, though, that your reference-providers may not put this task at the top of their priority list. They may forget. You may have to remind them what work you did with them several years ago. (Providing them with a copy of your application is a good thing, but remind them to add some words of their own.) Allow some time for you to remind your references. 

    Transcripts / Diplomas – We require a proof of your degree (aka diploma or qualification) to determine how much experience you need to document. If you don't now if we'll agree your degree qualifies for reduced experience, you should submit a transcript showing the math and science courses you took. None of this needs to be official copies. You’re welcome to snap a photo with your phone and email it in for proof of degree. 

    Exam Prep – ASEP and CSEP candidates will spend many hours reviewing the INCOSE SE Handbook in preparation for the knowledge exam. Some people pass the exam without studying, but most folks spend more than 40 hours preparing for the exam. Some spend more than 80 hours. The factors in this study time include how much SE you know already, how similar what you know already is to the INCOSE definitions, how efficient you are at studying, and what your target knowledge level is. 

    End-to-end, it typically takes an applicant (you) a month or two to gather information and prepare for the exam. Many do it slower; fewer do it faster.

    Now comes “our” part. For ASEPs, it’s easy. You send us an application and payment; we send you an exam code (allow a few weeks); you schedule, take, and pass the exam; we notify you you’re certified (allow a few weeks). 

    For CSEPs, that process above runs in parallel to our assessment of your application package. The Certification Program Office’s biggest hold-up is waiting for your references to come in. Once we get them all, we send your files to a review team. They are volunteers, CSEPs or ESEPs, most of whom hold full-time jobs just like you. We allow them 30 days to work as a team to assess whether your application package demonstrates your satisfaction of the SEP requirements. It takes us a week or two on either side of that to handle paperwork. We aim to get certification responses out within two months of receiving your complete set of materials. 

    Back to the main question, it is possible to get certified within 3 months. It’s hard but do-able. It is more likely to take 4 to 7 months. We allow 12 months to complete the process, but we advise against waiting until the end. You’ll lose momentum you’d have if you pushed through early on, and there’s too much opportunity for something to get in your way and push you past the deadline. 

  • What if I fail the exam?

    by Courtney Wright | Mar 12, 2021

    Each candidate is allowed to take the exam three times every 12 months. If you have attempts remaining, you may schedule to take the exam again. We sometimes have a waiting period before you can take the exam again. This occurs only while we are waiting to process information, like scoring a paper exam.  

    We recommend you read the INCOSE Systems Engineering Handbook several times before attempting the knowledge exam. This is more important than being a skilled test-taker, as we have written our questions to require knowledge from the handbook. 

    Certification application fees do not including testing fees. Most exams cost either 30 USD for paper exams or 80 USD for computer exams. 

    There are two ways to get certified without taking the knowledge exam. For ASEP and CSEP, you may bypass the exam through an academic equivalency. ESEP candidates do not have to take a knowledge exam at all.

  • Is the exam offered only in English?

    by Courtney Wright | Mar 08, 2021

    INCOSE’s activities are generally handled in English, and that is the standard language of all aspects of INCOSE’s Certification Program. The SE Handbook, application materials, knowledge exam, and interviews are all published or performed in English. We are aware that candidates for whom English is not their first language – or perhaps not a language they speak at all – this is a significant hurdle. We are working to identify, evaluate, and implement alternate paths to certification that will recognize knowledgeable SEPs without penalty for their English skills. 

    Testing Accommodations – Applicants for whom English is not their first language may request additional time (30 minutes, added to the standard 120 minutes) for the knowledge exam. These candidates may also bring in a paper translation dictionary to use during the exam. The special accommodation request is found on the Forms page

    Academic Equivalency - INCOSE's Academic Equivalencies are a recognition of university coursework (taught in any language) as an alternate path to meeting the knowledge requirement for ASEP or CSEP certification. A student who does well in an academic equivalency course or courses may be able to skip the knowledge exam when applying for ASEP or CSEP.

  • What’s the passing score?

    by Courtney Wright | Feb 17, 2021

    We work with professional psychometricians to develop our test formats, content, and scoring methods. At their advice, we don’t do the following: 

    • Publish the passing score.
    • Publish the average score. 
    • Tell individuals what their score was. 

    I’ll delve a little more into each of these numbers. 

    Passing Score – It’s less than 100%. We don’t require perfect knowledge (or test-taking performance). It’s comparable to the score required for other professional exams or university-level engineering courses. 

    Average Score – Average for whom? All test-takers, even those who are taking it for practice without having started studying? Only those who speak a particular language? (The exam is offered only in English but is taken by native speakers of many other languages.) What about those with military experience? Or those with graduate-level technical degrees? The average score is not useful for an individual to predict his or her own performance. 

    Individual Score – You’ll be told if you passed or failed.

    I know it’s dissatisfying for an engineer not to have numbers. I apologize. We have given this substantial consideration and have no plans to share these numbers. If you can present a compelling reason (e.g., legal requirement, betterment of society’s SE knowledge), please do so via an email to certification@incose.org

  • May I take the exam before submitting the application?

    by Courtney Wright | Feb 17, 2021

    Yes. Starting in 2014, in preparation for the release of the Fourth Edition of the INCOSE Handbook, the Certification Program began offering the knowledge exam at conferences and in classrooms for the purpose of testing new exam questions. This marked the beginning of a test-first approach, although it was initially limited to these paper-based, classroom exams. 

    In 2021, INCOSE is offering internet-based testing. Candidates will still need to register with INCOSE before taking the exam. They will then be able to schedule the knowledge exam online.  They will be limited to three (3) attempts per 12 month period.  

  • Who wrote these questions?

    by Courtney Wright | Feb 17, 2021

    The Certification Program Manager works with INCOSE’s Certification Advisory Group and already-certified individuals to generate the content for the exam. All exam questions and answers come from the text in the Systems Engineering Handbook. The editing and formatting are influenced by our psychometric consultants. Think you can help us make it better? Volunteers must be INCOSE ASEPs, CSEPs, or ESEPs and should apply at the INCOSE Volunteer Opportunity Board: https://www.incose.org/about-incose/volunteer-opportunities/vo-request  

    Additional information about the knowledge exam is listed here: https://www.incose.org/systems-engineering-certification/certification-exams

  • Blog Introduction

    by Courtney Wright | Feb 17, 2021

    This blog is maintained by the INCOSE Certification Program Office and provides information to augment the main INCOSE website. This will provide more details about the certification process, insight into the reasoning behind certification policies, and an early look at planned changes. The blog will capture the sort of information the Certification Program Manager typically shares at conferences and face-to-face meetings, which tends to be more casual and detailed than the official materials. 

    ASEP CSEP ESEP

    If you have a topic you’d like to have addressed in the blog, email certification@incose.org and they’ll forward it to the Program Manager. You can also get more information from the official website of the Certification Program: https://www.incose.org/systems-engineering-certification/certification

  • Does it matter if my job title isn’t “Systems Engineer”?

    by Courtney Wright | Jan 26, 2021

    Have you ever done a job search for “systems engineer” and gotten a list of jobs that were completely unlike how you (and INCOSE) define systems engineering? 

    We don’t make certification decisions based on job title. We look at the work you did, not that your title was “Consultant” or “Supreme Chief Engineer.” Much systems engineering work is done without the job title of “systems engineer.” As you look at the instructions for filling out the CSEP application (found here: SEP forms page), Attachment A of Form 2 gives details about the type of work that qualifies as systems engineering. There are no restrictions on the domain/department (e.g., IT, human resources) or job title; our focus is on the work you did. 

  • Welcome to the Hallway

    by Barclay Brown | Jan 22, 2021
    The INCOSE IW2021 Hallway is live! If you are registered for the INCOSE International Workshop 2021, held online, and you are an INCOSE member, you should have received an invitation to join the Hallway. Carry on casual conversations with other IW attendees, and see how Teams works. Then join teams to collaborate with others in your WGs, chapters and throughout INCOSE! 
  • Talking with Team Inspiration

    by Barclay Brown | Dec 19, 2020
    Hi Folks,

    I was thrilled to speak with Team Inspiration the other day about the meeting challenges of AI with systems Engineering. 

    TI 1607915750499

    And here's a video about their adventures.