A better world through a systems approach

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Webinar 15:00 UTC: "Affordable Architectures - How do I recognize one?"

INCOSE Webinar: "Affordable Architectures - How do I recognize one?"
Date:  15 February 2012
Time: 15:00 UTC
Presenter(s): Dr. Thomas E. Herald, Jr.
General Webinar Details: Webinar 40

 
Abstract:
The US defense department has undergone many evolutionary shifts in recent years. These shifts include movement from a system or platform-centric focus to a full mission objective, from a single purpose solution to systems with adaptive relevancy, from a primary system only focus to embracing a holistic system including enabling and support systems and from a design/acquisition cost decision to a complete life cycle comparative analyses. Dr. Robert Gates, Secretary of Defense, has challenged defense contractors to forego designing an „exquisite system‟ in favor of a compliant „80% solution‟. What exactly might this affordability challenge mean, how do we embrace it and what must we do differently? Within different military domains there are varying definitions or views of system architecture, and the same holds true for the term affordability. This presentation explores how to review an architecture, what are the attributes of a successful architecture, and specifically how to define the domain-relevant trade space for affordable architecture design.
 
Bio:
Dr. Thomas E. Herald Jr. received a M.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Maryland, and a B.S. in EE from the University of Pittsburgh. He earned a Ph.D. in Systems Engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, NJ. As part of the Systems Design and Operational Effectiveness Program within the School of Systems and Enterprises at Stevens, the focus of his research is to provide the systems engineer with an integrated approach for the development and execution of technology and obsolescence evolution. Tom‟s research was published (SSE Press) in 2008: An obsolescence forecasting methodology for strategic system sustainment decision making. With industrial experience at IBM and now Lockheed Martin, Tom is a Senior Fellow with the Global Training and Logistics group in Orlando, FL. His interests include the system engineering linkages of supportability parameters, obsolescence, and technology insertion considerations proactively influencing affordable system designs and life cycle sustainment. Tom received certification as an Expert Systems Engineering Professional by INCOSE in 2011. Tom is an adjunct professor for systems engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology (2 courses) and teaches Introduction to systems engineering for the University of Central Florida.
The US defense department has undergone many evolutionary shifts in recent years. These shifts include movement from a system or platform-centric focus to a full mission objective,