A better world through a systems approach

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Webinar 16:00 UTC:"SoSE from the SE Standards, INCOSE SE Handbook, and Dual V-Model Perspective"

INCOSE Webinar: "SoSE from the SE Standards, INCOSE SE Handbook, and Dual V-Model Perspective"
Date: 18 February 2015
Time: 16:00 UTC/ 11am EST
Presenter(s): John O. Clark
General Webinar Details: Webinar 78

Abstract:
SoSE from the SE Standards, INCOSE SE Handbook, and Dual V-Model Perspectives

System of Systems Engineering (SoSE) continues to be one of the most complex and least well-understood SE disciplines. Knowledge of the SE Standards, the INCOSE SE Handbook, and the Dual-V Model significantly aids this understanding, including the relationship between SE and SoSE, and helps apply them to SoS. The goals of this presentation are to: 1) define system, SE, SoS, and SoSE from the SE Standards and INCOSE perspectives; 2) describe the SE Standards, INCOSE SE Handbook, and Dual-V Model; 3) show how to apply them to SoS; and 4) encourage and challenge the participants to understand, select, tailor, and apply them to SoS. Individuals may have an understanding of portions of SE and SoSE based on other sources. The SE Standards, INCOSE SE Handbook, and the Dual-V Model provide a more complete and common understanding.
 
 
Biography:
John O. Clark is a retired Chief Engineer and Corporate Systems Engineering (SE) Instructor at Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC) with several years experience applying SE and Software Engineering. He is an internationally recognized speaker and Subject Matter Expert in SE, an SE tutorials instructor in major SE symposia and webinars, and a founder and member of several NGC and INCOSE Working Groups (WGs). For NGC, John was the founder of the SE Handbook WG, the Agile Community of Practice (CoP), and the INCOSE CoP; a key member of the Process WG, Training WG, and Requirements WG; the SE Associates (SEA) SE instructor; and the lead SE developer of the NGC SE Handbook and SE101 course. For INCOSE, he is the Training WG founder and chair, Process Improvement WG chair, SE Handbook Tutorial project leader and instructor, SE Fundamentals Tutorial developer and instructor, a Certified SE Professional (CSEP), and the Director of Education and Training of the INCOSE Hampton Roads Area Chapter. Recipient of the NGC Exemplary Performance Award for Multi-Sector Collaboration from Wes Bush (NGC President and CEO) and Dr John Chino (NGC VP of Programs and Engineering) for developing the NGC SE Handbook. Recipient of the coveted INCOSE Outstanding Service Award and selected to the INCOSE Hall of Leaders at the INCOSE International Symposium in 2010 “For promoting the INCOSE Certification program through leadership in the development and ongoing delivery of the INCOSE SE Handbook Tutorial.” Recipient of the INCOSE Technical Operations Collaboration Award at the INCOSE International Workshop in 2014 “For the development, delivery, and management of the portfolio of INCOSE webinars, tutorials, and presentations in collaboration with Chapters and other Working Groups.” John is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 1220 WG; a member of the
Society of Automotive Engineers G-47 SE committee developing EIA-632A; the lead of the G-33/G-47 Technical Reviews and Audits WG; a representative to the U.S. Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO); and a member of the review teams for ISO/IEC/IEEE 15288, 12207, TR 19760, TR 24748, and the INCOSE SE Handbook. BSEE Penn State, MSEE State University of New York, SE Advisory Council member at the University of Maryland, and adjunct SE instructor at the California Institute of Technology (CalTech), University of Maryland, and Old Dominion University.
System of Systems Engineering (SoSE) continues to be one of the most complex and least well-understood SE disciplines.