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Orlando Chapter Meeting
November 2014
What:Manufacturing Cyber-Physical Systems Enabled by Complex Event Processing and Big Data Environments
Who:Radu F. Babiceanu, Ph.D.
When:Thursday, 20 November 2014
Where:UCF Business Incubator(Room 116), 3267 Progress Drive, Orlando, FL 32826
Itinerary:Food Served 5:45 - 6:15 pm; Program 6:15 - 7:30pm
RSVP:Use our RSVP Site by 5pm Tuesday 18 November
Membership:Open to all. You do not need to be an INCOSE member to attend, but if you would like to join, please use the INCOSE Membership Application
Cost:None. Dinner is provided courtesy of our sponsor SAIC with RSVP

About the Presentation
The recent leap advances in sensor and communication technologies made possible the Internet connectivity of the physical world, where not only documents and images are created, shared, or modified in the cyberspace, but also the physical resources interact and make decisions based on shared communication. The decades old manufacturing operations question of choosing the right answer in the face of disturbances created by certain unexpected events or their aggregation, could now be one step further to receive the right answer. A sensor-packed manufacturing system in which each process or piece of equipment makes available event and status information, coupled with market research for advanced Big Data analytics, seem to be the right ingredients for event response selection, moving manufacturing closer to the cloud manufacturing systems paradigm. Besides the inherent advantages that come with the cloud manufacturing capabilities, the resulting manufacturing cyber-physical system is also subjected to the known setbacks of the software and Internet-based systems, from which cyber-security needs to be addressed at the forefront.

About the Speaker
Radu F. Babiceanu is an Associate Professor of Systems Engineering with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Dr. Babiceanu studies the “big picture” implications of today’s large and complex engineered systems. His work addresses essential aspects in the design, development, and operational phases of large-scale engineered systems by intertwining software and systems engineering with relevant systems-oriented methods and tools such as optimization, discrete-event and continuous simulation, decision analysis, and multi-agent systems. He has published more than 40 papers in peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings and his research was funded by NSF, NASA, DoD, and Dept. of Veterans Affairs, among others. Dr. Babiceanu holds a M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Toledo, and a Ph.D. in Industrial and Systems Engineering from Virginia Tech.
Orlando Chapter Meeting
October 2014
What:Emerging Technologies – What's New?
Who:Joe Vandeville, Northrop Grumman (Retired)
When:Thursday, 16 October 2014
Where:Technology Point II, Bishop CR 126, 3051 Technology Parkway , Orlando, FL 32826
Itinerary:Food Served 5:45 - 6:15 pm; Program 6:15 - 7:30pm
RSVP:Use our RSVP Site by 5pm Tuesday 14 October
Membership:Open to all. You do not need to be an INCOSE member to attend, but if you would like to join, please use the INCOSE Membership Application
Cost:None. Dinner is provided courtesy of our sponsor SAIC with RSVP

About the Presentation
Technology evolves at a rapid pace and sometimes it’s difficult to keep up on the latest buzz. This presentation will give an overview of several emerging technologies. Some of the topics to be covered are 4D printing, applications of smart materials (self cleaning, self healing, smart adhesives, shape shifting materials, non-Newtonian fluids) and eSkin. Each of these areas may be necessary for systems engineering consideration.

About the Speaker
Joe Vandeville is a recently retired Embedded Software Engineer at Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, where he worked in the area of engineering process management and engineering standards. He was associated with the development of software intensive systems for about 45 years in hardware and software development in both commercial and military systems. He has Master of Science Degrees in both Computer Science and Systems Engineering from the Florida Institute of Technology. He is the Past-President of the Space Coast Chapter of the International Council on Systems Engineering, and has authored or co-authored over a dozen technical articles, primarily in the areas of process improvement and process simulation.
Orlando Chapter Meeting
September 2014
What:Maritime RobotX Challenge
Who:Dr. Patrick N. Currier, Assistant Professor from the Mechanical Engineering Department at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
When:Thursday, 25 September 2014
Where:Technology Point II, Bishop CR 126, 3051 Technology Parkway , Orlando, FL 32826
Itinerary:Food Served 5:45 - 6:15 pm; Program 6:15 - 7:30pm
RSVP:Use our RSVP Site by 5pm Tuesday 23 September
Membership:Open to all. You do not need to be an INCOSE member to attend, but if you would like to join, please use the INCOSE Membership Application
Cost:None. Dinner is provided courtesy of our sponsor SAIC with RSVP

About the Presentation
The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) and Office of Naval Research (ONR) sponsored Maritime RobotX Challenge is currently the premiere collegiate autonomous systems challenge in the world. It is designed to promote unity among Pacific rim allies by bringing together university teams from the United States, Australia, Japan, South Korea, and Singapore to develop and demonstrate autonomous maritime vehicles. Embry-Riddle has been selected as one of the three teams to represent the US at the competition and has developed the Minion USV platform as its entry. Minion is a fully-autonomous 5m articulated catamaran wave adapted modular vessel (WAM-V) and is equipped with electric rim-driven propellers, on-board computing, and a sensor suite including light detection and ranging (LIDAR), cameras, a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, and hydrophones. The talk will focus on the team’s approach to development of the system and the algorithmic approach to completing challenges including autonomous navigation, obstacle avoidance, docking, and sonar target location as they prepare for competition in Singapore in October, 2014.

About the Speaker
Dr. Patrick Currier is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. He has extensive experience developing autonomous and unmanned systems, with projects including the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Urban and Grand Challenges, autonomous mining, and the Marine Corps Ground Unmanned Support Surrogate (GUSS), the QinetiQ Raider II, and the Maritime RobotX Challenge. He currently teaches and researches in the area of robotic and high-performance vehicle systems and serves as an advisor for the seven AUVSI robotics competition teams at Embry-Riddle’s Robotics Association and as lead faculty advisor for the Department of Energy (DOE) and General Motors EcoCAR 3 hybrid vehicle development program for which he was named the National Science Foundation (NSF) Outstanding Incoming Faculty Advisor in 2014.
Orlando Chapter Meeting
August 2014
What:Systems Engineering in the Next Decade
Who:Robert Halligan, FIE Aust CPEng
When:Wednesday, 27 August 2014
Where:UCF Business Incubator(Room 116), 3267 Progress Drive, Orlando, FL 32826
Itinerary:Food Served 5:45 - 6:15 pm; Program 6:15 - 7:30pm
RSVP:Use our RSVP Site by 5pm Monday 25 August
Membership:Open to all. You do not need to be an INCOSE member to attend, but if you would like to join, please use the INCOSE Membership Application
Cost:None. Dinner is provided courtesy of our sponsor SAIC with RSVP

About the Presentation
What are we presently achieving in systems engineering? With systems becoming increasingly complex and software intensive, what will the next decade bring? Will we see an improved success rate in engineering projects?
We propose a definition of 'success' as seen through the eyes of different stakeholders in a system, including, as applicable, users, customers, suppliers, developers, etc. The role of measures of effectiveness vis-a-vis Requirements is examined.
The paper assesses the current state of systems engineering practice against typical success criteria, using objective data to draw conclusions. We then put forward thoughts on how the next decade may be used to improve substantially the results of our projects. We prioritize the problem areas, and propose a remedy, a course of action, for each. In doing so, we address societal issues such as the impact on deep thinking of mobile devices, and the ongoing challenge to align engineering education outcomes with the needs of society, government and industry.

About the Speaker
Robert Halligan is an executive professional engineer, manager and engineering practitioner, renowned internationally for his role in the practice and improvement of technology-based projects. He is highly sought after as a consultant for his considered expertise. The passion Mr. Halligan brings to systems engineering, and how to translate it into enterprise improvement, have benefited countless organizations worldwide: private, government and academic. Since earning his qualifications in communications engineering at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (now RMIT University), Mr. Halligan has gained experience in almost every definable business sector, over a broad spectrum of technologies. He has performed engineering, engineering management and project management roles in private enterprise, including large transnational corporations (Rockwell, Andrew Corporation), and in the defense area of the public sector. Products and systems developed by Mr. Halligan over many years have achieved commercial success in the United States and in Australia, and remain in use today. Application areas in which Mr. Halligan has significant experience are r.f. communications (he spent the first fifteen years of his career as a r.f. systems engineer and engineering manager), medical products, aviation, consumer products, energy, land transportation, space and defense. Page 8 of 21 Mr. Halligan has led numerous requirements analysis efforts, on projects of up to $1 billion. As a hands--‐on engineering manager, he is expert in the strengths and weaknesses of a wide range of commercial and military specification standards. He has consulted extensively in the area of requirements quality and its relationship to project risk and has prepared or reviewed well over one hundred significant requirements specifications. Clients include BAE Systems (UK), Raytheon (USA), GDLS (USA, Canada), MDS Sciex (Canada), Smiths Aerospace (USA), Mitsubishi (Japan), Aerosystems International (UK), Tellabs Inc, (USA), Kongsberg Defence (Norway), Cochlear (Australia, Belgium), EADS (Germany), Thales (the Netherlands, Australia), Department of Defence (Australia), Airservices Australia (Australia), NATS (UK), Nokia (Poland), Boston Scientific (USA), HAVELSAN (Turkey), and many others. Mr. Halligan is a Past President of the Systems Engineering Society of Australia. He was an Australian delegate to the ISO WG7 developing the international system life cycle processes standard, ISO/IEC 15288, and led the delegation of the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) to ISO/IEC JTC1 SC7 on software and systems engineering. Mr. Halligan was a key reviewer of EIA 632 (Engineering of Systems) and EIA 731 (Systems Engineering Capability Model). He was a contributor of content to EIA/IS 632 and its successor in the area of requirements quality, and to IEEE 1220 in the area of functional analysis. Mr. Halligan served as Director (International) of INCOSE. Among his achievements, Mr. Halligan has led five systems engineering capability assessments, between other consulting engagements and an extensive program of public and on-site training in systems engineering and related topics such as technical reviews and audits, requirements analysis, specification writing, and project risk management. This training program is delivered over six continents.
Orlando Chapter Meeting
July 2014
What:A Perfect Shelter for the Incoming Perfect Storm: Excellence through System Modeling in the Capture Phase
Who:Dr. Tom Herald, ESEP, INCOSE-Orlando Past President, Lockheed Martin Senior Fellow
When:Thursday, 17 July 2014
Where:UCF Business Incubator(Room 116), 3267 Progress Drive, Orlando, FL 32826
Itinerary:Food Served 5:45 - 6:15 pm; Program 6:15 - 7:30pm
RSVP:Use our RSVP Site by 5pm Tuesday 15 July
Membership:Open to all. You do not need to be an INCOSE member to attend, but if you would like to join, please use the INCOSE Membership Application
Cost:None. Dinner is provided courtesy of our sponsor SAIC with RSVP

About the Presentation
As the US military budgets shrink even more due to continuing resolutions, sequestration and economic pressures to be more affordable, our customers are demanding that we truly understand and adapt to their true needs and align our value proposition directly to those needs for affordable mission performance. We are also seeing proposal timelines as short as 30-day deliveries, so it is critical that we fully understand the needs and value metrics of our customers BEFORE the RFP (or even the draft RFP). This presentation explores ways to achieve this in a proactive way, leveraging tangible models that capture the customer value proposition and guide the capture process with focus and confidence. This journey applies equally to new capture efforts, and is becoming equally critical for retaining existing contracts (or worse yet, for affordability-based re-competition).

About the Speaker
  • Senior Fellow for Lockheed Martin, Mission Systems & Training, Orlando, FL
  • INCOSE ESEP
  • BSEE, MSEE and Systems Engineering doctorate from the School of Systems & Enterprises at Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Published book on Amazon: "Obsolescence Management Forecasting: for Strategic Operational System Sustainment Decision Making"
  • IBM (14 yrs) and Lockheed Martin (18 yrs) defense-sector solutions
  • Adjunct Professor for Systems Engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology (Hoboken, NJ) and at the University of Central Florida Professional Engineering Management Program (Orlando, FL)

Orlando Chapter Meeting
May 2014
What:Quantifying the Effectiveness of Systems Engineering
Who:Joseph Elm, ESEP, PMP
When:Thursday, 15 May 2014
Where:UCF Business Incubator(Room 116), 3267 Progress Drive, Orlando, FL 32826
Itinerary:Food Served 5:45 - 6:15 pm; Program 6:15 - 7:30pm
RSVP:Use our RSVP Site by 5pm Tuesday 13 May
Membership:Open to all. You do not need to be an INCOSE member to attend, but if you would like to join, please use the INCOSE Membership Application
Cost:None. Dinner is provided courtesy of our sponsor SAIC with RSVP

About the Speaker
Mr. Elm is the Program Integration Manager within the Software Solutions Division of the Software Engineering Institute, a Federally Funded Research and Development Center operated by Carnegie Mellon University. In this role he focuses on systems engineering research and on managing multi-disciplinary programs in support of Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security programs. Mr. Elm has been a member of the SEI staff since 2001, holding various positions including CERT Strategic Projects Manager, and Acquisition Support Program Acting Director. He has an extensive background in systems engineering, product development, program management, corporate management, and government acquisition processes. Prior to joining the SEI, Mr. Elm served as Vice President and General Manager of Carco Electronics, a developer of precision electro-mechanical and robotic equipment used for testing missile guidance and navigation equipment. Mr. Elm holds a BS in Electrical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, and an MS in Electrical Engineering from the University of Pittsburgh. He is certified as an Expert Systems Engineering Professional by INCOSE, and a Project Management Professional by the Project Management Institute (PMI).
May 2014
Applied Systems Engineering Fundamentals
Full Day Tutorial: Wednesday, May 7th 2013, 8:30 - 5:00, UCF Partnership III, 3039 Technology Pkwy, Orlando, Florida 32826

Join us for a full day tutorial on Systems Engineering, presented by Jeff Bryson. The tutorial is full. If you are interested in a future tutorial, please fill out the link, below.

I am interested in a future Tutorial

Orlando Chapter Meeting
April 2014
What:Integrating Live-Virtual-Constructive (LVC) Technology into the Complex System of Navy Air Combat Training
Who:Dr Kelly Neville, Associate Professor in the Human Factors & Systems department at Embry Riddle
When:Thursday, 17 April 2014
Where:UCF Business Incubator(Room 116), 3267 Progress Drive, Orlando, FL 32826
Itinerary:Food Served 5:45 - 6:15 pm; Program 6:15 - 7:30pm
RSVP:Use our RSVP Site by 5pm Tuesday 15 April
Membership:Open to all. You do not need to be an INCOSE member to attend, but if you would like to join, please use the INCOSE Membership Application
Cost:None. Dinner is provided courtesy of our sponsor SAIC with RSVP

About the Presentation
As U.S. military training needs evolve, the uses and capabilities of virtual and constructive (VC) entities (respectively operated by humans in simulators and computer software) have adapted to meet them. Recently, military training needs have led to a push to introduce VC aircraft into live air combat training. In this new live-virtual-constructive training paradigm, VC aircraft will appear on the avionics displays of fighter aircraft and participate in live air combat training scenarios. This LVC initiative presents a major systems engineering challenge-how to integrate new technology into an established complex system. Although there is a desire for a seamless transition, changes in the air combat training system will likely be necessary. This presentation will focus on ongoing research to identify and plan for the adaptations potentially required of both air combat training and LVC technology in support of a successful integration process.

About the Speaker
Kelly Neville is an Associate Professor of Human Factors and Systems at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. As a nationally recognized expert in the human factors of complex work systems, she has contributed to the evaluation and design of training systems and human-machine interfaces for satellite operations, military command-and-control, U.S. Marine Corp combined arms operations, U.S. Air Force air combat, U.S. Navy strike and air combat operations, uninhabited aircraft systems (UAS), and petrochemical processing operations. Her research includes naturalistic, field, simulation-based, and laboratory studies. Examples include studies of fatigue effects on cognitive performance, expert-novice differences in team coordination, learning theories and their consistency with expert instruction, and expert memory in visual versus auditory air traffic control conditions. Dr. Neville has advised five first-place teams in the FAA's annual Airport Design Competition for Universities. She earned master's and doctoral degrees from Rice University and is the author of over 50 academic and technical publications.
Orlando Chapter Meeting
March 2014
What:AEROSPACE GUIDANCE, NAVIGATION, AND CONTROL: "A MATHEMATICAL MYSTERY TOUR"
Who:Lou Glaros, Lockheed Martin Fellow
When:Thursday, 20 March 2014
Where:UCF Business Incubator(Room 116), 3267 Progress Drive, Orlando, FL 32826
Itinerary:Food Served 5:45 - 6:15 pm; Program 6:15 - 7:30pm
RSVP:Use our RSVP Site by 5pm Tuesday 18 March
Membership:Open to all. You do not need to be an INCOSE member to attend, but if you would like to join, please use the INCOSE Membership Application
Cost:None. Dinner is provided courtesy of our sponsor SAIC with RSVP

About the Presentation
Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) is a key technology in flight vehicle engineering, without which most airborne or space-based craft couldn't function. Steeped in a rich legacy of applied mathematics, GNC is often practiced as a balance between theory, analytical rigor, and the constraints of engineering design and manufacturing...sort of an "equal opportunity employer" for both the math geeks and mechanical practitioners amongst us. This eclectic presentation will walk the audience through a whirlwind tour of GNC as applied to different aerospace vehicles, emphasizing the historical traditions from which applied mathematics has morphed into engineering solutions and from which intuitive designs have led to exciting math discoveries.

About the Speaker
Like many of the Baby Boomer Generation Lou was greatly influenced by SPUTNIK and the early space race and, inspired by the first moon landings, set his mind on becoming a "ROCKET SCIENTIST", designing and building cool flying machines and satisfying his urge to remain a math geek. So off to Purdue University he trekked and 4 1/2 years later, in late 1973, snuck out with an MS in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering; specializing in flight mechanics, optimization theory, and "plotting vast amounts of data by hand". After graduation he headed to Florida where he took his first... and only... job in the GNC Department at what was then Martin Marietta (now Lockheed Martin). During the next 40 years, he worked on most of the company's major missile and sensor programs, pushing the state of the art in several amazing technologies... including an early supersonic flight demonstration of Integral Rocket Ramjet propulsion, the first ever tactical implementation of a Stellar Inertial Navigation System, advanced orbital guidance mechanizations for space defense applications, and integrated detection and tracking systems for surveillance and guidance closure. His technical specialties include flight mechanics, aided inertial navigation, missile guidance, inertial tracking, and optimal estimation. He is a Distinguished Member of the Group Technical Staff at LM Missiles and Fire Control and an LM Corporate Engineering Fellow. In 2012 he was selected as the MFC Engineer of the Year and awarded for Technical Excellence at the Lockheed Martin NOVA Awards in Washington, DC. Outside of work, Lou is an avid hiker, runner, and cyclist and has also written four books on the fine art of canoe paddling. He resides in Orlando, Florida with his wife, Carol, close to his daughter, Melissa, and four grandchildren; Clint Jr., Ethan, Joseph, and Angie. Still a kid at heart, he can and does play as hard as them...though he has to quit a little sooner.
Orlando Chapter Meeting
February 2014
What:Tactical Targeting Network Technology, Quint Networking Technology, and Video Verification of Identity
Who:Stephen Waller, DARPA
When:Thursday, 20 February 2013
Where:UCF Business Incubator(Room 116), 3267 Progress Drive, Orlando, FL 32826
Itinerary:Food Served 5:45 - 6:15 pm; Program 6:15 - 7:30pm
RSVP:Use our RSVP Site by 5pm Tuesday 18 February
Membership:Open to all. You do not need to be an INCOSE member to attend, but if you would like to join, please use the INCOSE Membership Application
Cost:None. Dinner is provided courtesy of our sponsor SAIC with RSVP

About the Presentation
DARPA is interested in establishing a modeling and simulation consortium, comprised of government and industry partners, who would employ Systems Engineering principles in generating and analyzing new ideas for blue force employment. The emphasis would be to ensure that analyses and concept development supports blue force concepts of employment. Under this structure, industry could provide data modules for integration into a government provided "shadow" assessment environment that enables component integration while protecting proprietary information and supports program security and classification needs. This approach would distribute risk across both government and industry, provide a means to integrate "seedling" concepts into an overall environment, and allow the government to act as the "assessor" of an integrated include integration of multiple "stovepiped" M&S capabilities across multiple organizations, system architectures, and security levels.
Orlando Chapter Meeting
January 2014
What:Innovation for NASA
Who:Carlos Capiro, CEO, Juntura Group Incorporated
When:Thursday, 30 January 2014
Where:UCF Business Incubator(Room 116), 3267 Progress Drive, Orlando, FL 32826
Itinerary:Food Served 5:45 - 6:15 pm; Program 6:15 - 7:30pm
RSVP:Use our RSVP Site by 5pm Tuesday 28 January
Membership:Open to all. You do not need to be an INCOSE member to attend, but if you would like to join, please use the INCOSE Membership Application
Cost:None. Dinner is provided courtesy of our sponsor SAIC with RSVP

About the Presentation
CEO and Co-Founder of Juntura Group, a Winter Park, FL company founded by Rollins MBA students that designs and manufactures technologically advanced non-contact position sensors. The sensors were used to search for nicks and cracks on the smooth glass windshield of the Space Shuttle.

About the Speaker
Long story short I studied molecular microbiology in undergrad, shifted gears and became a business analyst/ innovator for Northrop Grumman Laser Systems - side note I think I'm the first business analyst to receive a trade secret with respect to a design that I had with splitting and reintegrating the visible spectrum with 1.06nm energy in a very low cost, utilizing 85% COTS BoM parts. I decided to get my MBA at Rollins in December of 2012- during my last semester I had a consultation project with NASA that turned into a full scale commercial venture.
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